When He and I see it Differently

Originally posted on TrueWoman.com. 

160418-when-he-and-iMy husband was nice enough to take our sixth grader shopping for running shoes recently. But the shoes they came home with were not shoes I would have bought.

They looked great; they were bright and fun-looking. But they were also twenty dollars more than I would have paid. And they didn’t look very supportive for running, either, which was the whole point of buying new shoes.

I suspect that the selection process was heavily influenced by both my son’s enthusiasm over the shoe color and his dad’s ambition to get out of the store quickly. Neither of these, in my opinion, were good reasons to buy these particular shoes.

“I’m taking them back,” I said.

“What?” my husband said. “Then why did you ask me to take him shopping in the first place?”

I then listed out all of the reasons these shoes were a bad idea. Apparently he hadn’t seen the way inferior shoes tend to cave under the pressure of a twelve-year-old boy running. And perhaps he wasn’t aware that our son would claim any shoe felt supportive if it was the right color. I was quite certain that these shoes wouldn’t even last the full season. I’d have to replace them in a month.

None of these reasons, however, won my husband over to my viewpoint. He just kept voicing frustration over the wasted shopping trip.

When We Disagree

Ken’s head tends to be clear of all of the worries and concerns that fill mine. He doesn’t fret over possibilities the way I do or extrapolate into the future. He just steps out into the wild blue yonder and buys shoes without even considering that the kid trying them on might be pretending that they fit well. Crazy, right?

I often feel that Ken’s clear perspective needs to be clouded up with a few of my concerns…

Read the rest here.